AIHW Reports

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Stolen Generations aged 50 and over: updated analyses for 2018–19

This report, collated by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW), provides contemporary evidence of the ‘gap within the gap’. It shows that Stolen Generations survivors aged 50 and over are more likely to be worse off than other Indigenous Australians of the same age on a range of health and socioeconomic outcomes.

It builds off a previous report by the AIHW, released in 2018, which examined data from 2014-15. The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Stolen Generations and descendants: numbers, demographic characteristics and selected outcomes report uncovered chronic health issues, disability, and alarming levels of economic and social disadvantage for the Stolen Generations and their descendants. The first demographic study of its kind, it provided comprehensive data to illustrate the direct link between the forced removal of tens of thousands of children from their families and the real-life symptoms of intergenerational trauma within today’s families and communities.

We now know that there are more than 33,000 survivors, all of whom will be aged 50 and over in 2022; and that, across the nation, a third of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults are descended from Stolen Generations.

In some States and Territories, descendants make up more than half of the population. This represents significant challenges for governments to address the growing needs in health, aged care, education, social justice, and equity.

It also represents a unique opportunity to unite the nation to achieve healing for all Australians.

Download the report

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Stolen Generations aged 50 and over

This Infocus report, released 20 November 2018, was collated by the AIHW. It highlighted the characteristics of,
and outcomes for, the Stolen Generations aged 50 and over at that time.

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Stolen Generations aged 50 and over: updated analyses for 2018–19 report (see above) builds off the evidence in this report.

Read the report Download the report

Children living in households with Stolen Generations survivors

This report, collated by the AIHW, provides a new perspective on the intergenerational impact of removal, by looking at outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged under 15 who live in households with Stolen Generations survivors.

It is the first time children have been connected to adults in the same household who were removed from their families to uncover direct evidence of the intergenerational effects of removal.

This report extends the analyses from two previous reports on the Stolen Generations prepared by the AIHW for The Healing Foundation. It examines five outcome areas for children, including health, life stressors, school attendance, language and culture, and some household measures.

Read the report

Stolen Generations survivor Uncle Michael Welsh

The tragic impact of past policies

 

The AIHW reports paint a disturbing picture of health issues, disability, and poor economic security factors for Stolen Generations survivors. As they rapidly approach their elderly years, their aged care needs will be far more complex than the average aging Australian.

Despite the1997 Bringing them Home report, the 2008 National Apology to the Stolen Generations, and many other inquiries, there has still been no systematic government response to the needs and rights of Stolen Generations survivors and their descendants.

Stolen Generations survivors have endured a lifetime of trauma, grief, and loss, and as a result, they carry a significant burden of health, wellbeing, social, and economic disadvantage.

They are growing older, and many live with disabilities and complex health problems, including poor mental health. They have increasingly complex and overlapping needs yet face personal and systemic barriers to accessing services. They are worried about the future of their families.

Compared to other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples of the same age, Stolen Generations survivors aged 50 and over are 

1.8 times as likely not to be the owner of a home

1.6 times as likely to live in a household that could not raise $2,000 in an
emergency

1.7 times as likely to have experienced discrimination due to being Indigenous

1.5 times as likely to have experienced actual or threatened physical violence

1.4 times as likely to have a disability as a severe or profound core activity
limitation

1.4 times as likely to have poor mental health

1.3 times as likely to have been diagnosed with a mental health condition

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